Notes

1. Samuel T. Turvey and Jennifer J. Crees, “Extinction in the Anthropocene,” Current Biology, vol. 29, no. 19 (October 7, 2019): R982 ;R985.

 

2. Pedro Cardosa, et. al., “Scientists warning to humanity on insect extinctions,” Biological Conservation, no. 242 (February 2020): 2.

3. Damian Carrington, “Plummeting insect numbers ‘threaten collapse of nature,’” The Guardian, February 10, 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/feb/10/plummeting-insect-numbers-threaten-collapse-of-nature (accessed May 11, 2021).

4. Kendra Pierre-Louis and Nadja Popovich, “Climate Change: It’s a Buzzkill for Bumblebees,” New York Times, February 6, 2020, https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/02/06/climate/bumblebees-extreme-heat-weather.html (accessed May 11, 2021).

5. Penguin Companion to Classical Music, s.v. "Interlude." 

6. See esp. Don L.F. Nilsen and Alleen Pace Nilsen, Language Play: An Introduction to Linguistics (Rowley, MA: Newbury House, 1978).

7. Stephen Walsh, Musorgsky and His Circle: A Russian Musical Adventure (New York: Knopf, 2013), 175.

8. Leonard B. Meyer, Explaining Music: Essays and Explorations (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1973), 5.

9. See Ernst Cassirer, The Philosophy of Symbolic Forms, 3 vols., trans. Steve G. Lofts (New York: Routledge, 2021); Claude Lévi-Strauss, Myth and Meaning, (New York: Routledge, 2001); Roland Barthes, S/Z, trans. Richard Miller (New York: Hill and Wang, 1974).

10. Jean-Jacques Nattiez, Music and Discourse: Toward a Semiology of Music, trans. Carolyn Abbate (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990), 72-3; 12.

11. Wendy Wheeler, The Whole Creature: Complexity, Biosemiotics and the Evolution of Culture (London: Lawrence and Wishart, 2006), 110.

12. Peter Harries-Jones, “Honeybees, Communicative Order, and the Collapse of Ecosystems,” Biosemiotics 2 (May 2009): 200-1.

13. I derive this idea of the surface encounter and nonhuman phenomenology on the basis of Rimsky-Korsakov's arrangement of sound from Ron Broglio, Surface Encounters: Thinking with Animals and Art, Posthumanities 17, series ed. Cary Wolfe (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2011).

14. All references to Keats's poem will appear as parenthetical citations in the text, and are to "Ode to a Nightingale" in John Keats: Complete Poems, ed. Jack Stillinger (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991), 279-281.

15. See ≪ λήθη ≫, or "Lethe" in the Greek in Hom. Il. 2.33, https://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:abo:tlg,0012,001:2:33&lang=original (accessed June 6, 2021). 

16. Helen Vendler, The Odes of John Keats (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1983), 86.

17. Julie Camarda, "Keats's Chameleon Poetics, Or, the Natural History of 'Ode to a Nightingale,'"Keats-Shelley Journal, vol. 68 (2019): 57.

18. Jakob von Uexküll, A Foray into the Worlds of Animals and Humans with a Theory of Meaning, trans. Joseph D. O'Neil, Posthumanities 12, series ed. Cary Wolfe (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010); Broglio, Surface Encounters, xxii; xxiii.

19. Sonia I. Ketchian, "In the Forest with Anna Akhmatova and John Keats,"Keats-Shelley Journal, vol. 48 (1999): 138.

20. Zinaida Vengerova, Джон Китс и его поэзия (Moscow: LitRes, 1889, republished in 2017), retrieved from http://books.google.com/. I'm grateful to Tamar Kharatishvili for translational assistance in regard to this text.