CURRICULUM VITÆ

 

PH.D. IN ART HISTORY, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

June 2020 (Expected)

Dissertation: “William Blake's Radical Ecology” (Advisor: Stephen F. Eisenman)

Ph.D. Qualifying Examination (20 March 2015) in the following fields:

  • 19th Century: Art and Politics (Examiner: Stephen F. Eisenman, Art History)

  • Modern and Contemporary Art: Modernism’s Ecological History (Examiner: Hannah Feldman, Art History)

  • William Blake Studies (Examiner: W.J.T. Mitchell, Art History/English Literature, University of Chicago)

 

Interdisciplinary Critical Theory Certificate (Spring 2015)

 

Northwestern University Paris Program in Critical Theory (Academic Year 2015-2016: "Jacques Derrida, Religion, and the Question of Singularity")

Language Certifications: French, German for Reading Knowledge

 

Affiliated with the Northwestern Critical Theory Interdisciplinary Cluster Initiative, Science and Human Culture Cluster, Political Theory Colloquium, Educational Teaching Technology Fellows/Digital Learning, and Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities, Feinberg School of Medicine

M.A. IN THE HISTORY OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE, UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

 June 2012

Advisor: Andrew Schulz

Areas of Focus: 18th-Century European Art, Romanticism, Theories and Methods of Art History, Architecture Theory and Sustainability

Co-Chair of "Art & Politics Graduate Symposium," April 12-3, 2012

Christine L. Sundt Award for Leadership

B.A. IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (SUMMA CUM LAUDE), ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

May 2010

Advisors: Mark S. Lussier (English) and Anthony Gully (Art History)

Minors: Art History and Religious Studies

Areas of Focus: Critical Theory and Continental Philosophy, English Romantic Literature, Ancient Greek Language and Literature, Italian Language and Literature

Languages studied: French, Italian, Ancient Greek

 

PUBLICATIONS

Peer Reviewed

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"WILLIAM BLAKE AND ART AGAINST SURVEILLANCE"

In William Blake and the Age of Aquarius. Edited by Stephen F. Eisenman, with contributions by Mark Crosby, Elizabeth Ferell, Jacob Henry Leveton, W.J.T. Mitchell, and John Murphy. Princeton University Press/Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, 2017. Companion book to the Northwestern exhibition that explored the impact of Blake's art on 20th-century American Art, Politics, and Culture, September 23, 2017-March 11, 2018.

 

My essay engages Blake's color-field abstraction and Abstract Expressionism as parallel responses to social pressures of coercion and control in late 18th-century England and mid 20th-century America.

“WILLIAM BLAKE’S חנוך (‘ENOCH’) LITHOGRAPH: PRODUCING THE THEME OF SELF-ANNIHILATION, RESISTING THE POLITICS OF THE NAPOLEONIC WARS”

Essays in Romanticism, vol. 24, no. 2 (Fall 2018): 161-186.

 

This article examines Blake's sole-known experiment in lithography that he created in tandem with the production of his first epic in illuminated printing, Milton: A Poem in [1]2 Books. In Blake's print, I find the means through which he responded to a passage in John Milton's epic Paradise Lost engaging with a politics of non-violence. I conclude that Blake's lithograph and illuminated book form a shared experimental artistic ecosystem, defined by a pacifist politics, and informed by a reading of Milton conditioned by the moment of the Napoleonic Wars. 

INVITED LECTURES

"BRITISH ROMANTICISM IN A WARMING WORLD"

Visiting Scholar Seminar: Yale Center for British Art, Lewis Walpole Library, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Sterling Memorial Library, March 26, 2018

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GRANTS, HONORS, & FELLOWSHIPS

VISITING SCHOLAR AWARD

"Blake's Radical Ecology," Yale Center for British Art, March 2018

I spent the month in residence working in the Department of Prints and Drawings on the extensive Blake holdings in the Paul Mellon Collection. I also explored Rare Books detailing new industrial architecture in London during Blake's time—especially that of coal distilleries for the first gas lighting of the city. 

OUTSTANDING GRADUATE STUDENT PAPER

2016 North American Society for the Study of Romanticism Conference, University of California—Berkeley

For essay "Painting Politics, Seeing Scientific Dissent: Spinoza, Wright's Experiment, Priestley's Chemistry," which I am currently revising for submission for peer-reviewed publication. 

WEINBERG COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES/EVAN FRANKEL FOUNDATION

Northwestern Paris Program in Critical Theory Fellowship, 2015-2016

Project: "Art and Engagement at the COP 21 United Nations Climate Summit"

While beginning my dissertation research, I was a critical theory fellow in Paris. There, I studied the work of Jacques Derrida under the contemporary philosophers Sam Weber (Northwestern/European Graduate School) and Marc Crépon (École Normale Superieure).

I engaged in fieldwork for my contemporary research project on the convergence of public art and environmental policy through the ArtCOP21 festival and the United Nations COP21 Climate Summit. 

In addition, I was an invited delegate and speaker for the Maire de Paris/Bloomberg Philanthropies "Sommet des Les Locaux pour Le Climat" [Summit of Local Elected Leaders] at the Hôtel de Ville, December 4, 2015.

 
 

Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art

Graduate Curatorial Fellowship, 2013-2014

 

Curator of "Ecological Looking: Sustainability & the End(s) of the Earth," September 19-November 30, 2014. Reviewed by Amy M. Hadad.

Curatorial Assistant for "William Blake and the Age of Aquarius," September 23, 2017-March 11, 2018. Reviewed by the Chicago Tribune, the SpectatorNew Art ExaminerThird Coast ReviewChicago Review,  The Chicago ReaderSplash Magazines, and the Times Literary Supplement

While completing coursework, I served as a curatorial fellow at the Block Museum of Art. It was in my capacity at the museum, given its mission to use art as a springboard for interdisciplinary conversations relevant to contemporary life, that I first expanded my work into the areas of global visual culture and eco-critical art history. 

For my exhibition, Ecological Looking, I brought together art, photographs, and rare books materials documenting and challenging technologies of industry and natural resource extraction. My curatorial research connected collections in Prints and Drawings at the Block with the Melville J. Herskovitz Library of African Studies at Northwestern. Ultimately, the project linked the visual culture of 20th-century American petrol-consumer culture with 19th-century regimes of mining in South Africa and speculative futures of mining and extra-planetary materials from outer space. 

LEADERSHIP + SERVICE

 

LEADERSHIP + SERVICE

 

SPECIAL CONFERENCE SESSIONS ORGANIZED

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

INVITED CONFERENCE ROUNDTABLE PARTICIPATION

References

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