Leveton_Sommet.jpg

I'm a Ph.D. Candidate in Art History at Northwestern University, where I'm also affiliated with the Critical Theory and the Science and Human Culture cluster programs. My work concerns visual culture, literature, and critical theory with a focus on the environment from the eighteenth century through the present.

 

My research has been supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Yale Center for British Art, and the Evan Frankel Foundation.


My first book, William Blake's Radical Ecology, explores how the English romantic visual artist and poet William Blake responded to the transformation of the built environment to accommodate coal-based technologies at the beginning of the British Industrial Revolution in London. Across my research, teaching, and curatorial practices, I seek to address the global histories, legacies, and entanglements implicated in the study of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century European art, politics, and technology. 


Beyond my dissertation and book project, I am currently completing a pair of stand-alone essays connected with my research in objects study at the Art Institute.  The first concerns the critical impact of Baurch Spinoza's radical philosophical project in Romantic London, focusing on the circulation of mezzotint reproductions of Joseph Wright's Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump painting. A second article explores metaphors of the digital and sustainability in the work of the contemporary architect Alisa Andrasek, the English alternative rock pioneers Radiohead, and the American post-hardcore band Thrice. Aspects of these projects have been presented at the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism conference, as well as the International Conference on Romanticism. I also serve as Co-Principal Investigator for the initiative COVID-19: Critical/Creative Studies in Music, Image, and Text, a project with the Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine that seeks to seed new forms of creative and collective practice in the wake of the global pandemic.